Thursday, September 27, 2018

What Today Feels Like

It is not like a rock in your shoe - rolling free in the arch where you can't feel it until it somehow lodges beneath your heel and annoys you. It's not like that. That is a memory from when I was seven and a neighbor kid stole my new bike. Pissing me off decades later, but really just an annoyance.


This is a virus that lives in my bones. A virus that comes roaring back to life and makes me feverish, weak, agitated like I'm covered in hives.

This is sexual assault. 

The fact that I couldn't sleep last night from the ache in my lower back. It's not some metaphor or literary device - it's the seat of my shame, of my pain, of my sexual assault. This is where it lives in me, dormant until triggered. Once released, it is overwhelming.

It is why I cannot watch the hearing of the Senate Judiciary Committee because that feels like drinking castor oil when you have the flu. Why would I want to make myself puke even more?

It is why, even though I'm not watching, I can't stop crying.
It is why I took the dogs for a very long walk this morning; because movement makes me feel better - gives me the illusion that I am not trapped like I once was, or twice, or three times. Outside, headed for the park, at least I'm not in the car with my boss groping me - unable to get away because we're on the highway and I'm buckled in and I need that job. At least I'm not in the dark back bedroom at the babysitter's house, floating away in my mind while her 17-year old son does what he does to my 8-year old body.

There is a war between my bones and my mind that I cannot reconcile. 


My mind wants me to tell, to release the stories, to join the #MeToo and #WhyIDidntReport movements - to add to the ground swell. It knows the power of story. It says it will make a difference.

My bones push back. They know that telling is not a guarantee of release. That doing so is not like picking that small rock out of my shoe and flinging it away. These stories will always be with me. They are a virus.

There is another part of me, a part whose name I don't know, that is enraged. This part of me, she is furious at the idea that more stories will get us to some tipping point - that there is some magical number of reported rapes and molestations and assaults that will flip a switch, turn the tide, change the cultural narrative. She wonders why we have to continue to rip our scars open and present them to others to be believed. SHE IS ANGRY BECAUSE WE NEED THEM TO BELIEVE US. Because it means that we are captive again - trapped until they "believe" us and release us. Because it reinforces the power differential.

The stories live within us. Always. 

It is why some of us drink too much, because numb is better sometimes.
It is why some of us cut ourselves, because the idea of release is so tempting.
It is why others deny themselves food or eat too much, because anything we can do to be in control of our own physical bodies feels like taking back power.
It is why some of us talk and talk and talk when we tell our stories, to still the questions waiting to tumble from your lips. Believe me, we've asked ourselves those questions over and over again and we still don't have the answers. Because the answer lies outside us - with the perpetrators - while the pain lives inside.

And yet, no recounting of the story will matter if you're not listening. If you are only waiting to turn this in to a philosophical debate or thought experiment, our stories will never matter, because your "What ifs" (she is lying/he was drunk/she was drunk/this is a setup/he thought he had consent/you're not remembering right) are about you and your discomfort with our stories. Turning it in to a "conversation" means you're not willing to listen to our lived experience. And if you're uncomfortable with the details hitting your ears, imagine how we feel with them living in our bones.

Monday, September 10, 2018

When Mothering is in Your Bones

By si.robi - https://www.flickr.com/photos/sirobi/14239128799/in/photostream/, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=33623062
There are so many things to be struck by in the story of Serena Williams and the US Open Women's Championship. I was pelted by many of them, both as I watched the match and afterward, reading and processing the controversy. I know there's no way to say what I think any better than Rebecca Traister did here, but one thing that's been rattling around in my head and heart since Serena protested the first warning won't leave me until I do write about it.

Serena seemed to be saying that she can't separate her tennis playing self from her mother self - she was as concerned about being accused of cheating for her own reputation as she was in regard to her role as a mother. I feel that so deeply.

I won't generalize to other mothers or even other parents, but for me, becoming a mother didn't just add an appendage to my Self, it added a thread that runs through every cell of it. Once I discovered I was pregnant, I was, in my mind, a mother. From that moment forward, I was never NOT a mother. In the background of every decision I made was the knowledge that I was tied to another being, responsible to that being.

When Serena told the judge that day, "I am a mother. I have a daughter," I knew what she meant. Growing up a girl in a world dominated by men, where we are told in a million different ways who we are allowed to be, what is expected of us, and what our limitations are, we yearn to break free. Often, we don't yearn to break free with a vengeance until we are mothers of girls, and then we positively scream to break free, to create a different dynamic, a new conversation, smash the patriarchy for our daughters. (Ok, I'm generalizing - sorry - this is how I feel, what I know in my bones).

When my daughters were little and they questioned why it was me up on the ladder changing the batteries in the smoke detector instead of Daddy, I felt empowered to offer them a different world view. When they heard me assert myself to a physician or a mechanic or a credit card company that wasn't taking me seriously, I did it knowing that they were watching, listening, learning. I was always a mother - demonstrating that whatever the world-at-large told them, they had the right to take up space, voice their beliefs, ask for what they deserved.

Eve is in her third week of college - across the country from me - and I'm still teaching her to look at the world in a different way, to ask critical questions about how it interacts with her (albeit a lot less). When she texted me last week, nervous to go in to the advising office a second time to switch a class, she was worried that she would be characterized as whiny or wishy-washy. If I had a dime for every time a man accused me of not being able to make up my mind, or being emotional, I could pay for all four years of her private college tuition right now. I understood. And then I marshaled my mother-muscles and texted back:

Girl, you are the customer here. The only reason the people in that advising office are employed at all is to help you with things like this. To guide you as you determine what your major will be, and which classes will best fit that. You do NOT have to feel bad or embarrassed about asking for their help. If you want me to, I'll send you a screenshot of the check I wrote them to ensure that they help you when you need it. You deserve to ask them to support you as you begin your college career (and throughout it). I love you. You got this. You're fine. 

Whether men know it or not, every second of every day of the rest of my life I will be a mother to these two young women. I am never NOT a mother - it is part of everything I do, every decision I make. It has made me stronger, wiser, and more confident. I totally understand Serena's fury at being accused of something she knows she is not in front of the whole world and her baby girl. When mothering is in your bones and you've taken up the mantle of raising the next generation of strong women, you feel every slight more profoundly. (Ok, I'm generalizing again - sorry.)

I don't know if fathers feel this way about their sons or daughters. What I do know is that this awesome privilege and responsibility of motherhood has changed me in a way that will never be undone.
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