Tuesday, November 07, 2017

The Problem With Compartmentalizing, Part Two

Part One is here. 

This one's for Birdie. 

Oh, Birdie. I don't know you, but I know you. We've never met, but I hear you. 

Birdie left a comment on the previous post that I'll excerpt. She wrote, in reference to seeking professional help to process the trauma she experienced as a child, "...I can’t be helped and soul destroying because it means I am really messed up. I am so afraid of opening Pandora’s box and becoming unable to deal with what lies waiting. But I am tired. Tired of never being happy. Tired of always feeling anxious. Tired of always, always being afraid."

Talk about 'bringing the whole house down.' That's what compartmentalizing does to us. It makes us feel safe for the moment, but it ultimately destroys us from the inside out. Because when we hide those things away - either for later or for what we think is forever - we deprive ourselves of community and support. 

Human beings are social creatures. We are designed to live with each other. Our bodies respond on a molecular level to touch and interaction from each other - our adrenal glands activate, our neurological systems light up, we secrete hormones that make us feel safe and loved and happy when we let ourselves share experiences with other people (and animals - never underestimate the power of a soft, furry creature to snuggle up to). 

But when we wall of parts of our human experience, we relegate ourselves to holding what are often the most traumatic and painful things all by ourselves. It is akin to telling everyone that we would like their help carrying the 20lb. box of papers but that they can go home after that because we'll figure out how to lug that 200lb. desk in the corner alone. Or not at all. There are so many reasons we do that - shame, denial, overwhelm. We hate that desk. Maybe we will just leave it there and never look at the corner where it sits, heavy and ugly. 

It is counterintuitive to expect ourselves to bear the heaviest weights alone. We can't do it, no matter how much we want to or how hard we try. And we aren't designed for it. But when we compartmentalize, that's what we're setting ourselves up for - isolation, solo work. 

So, Birdie, if you're reading this, know that even as you wait for a therapist who is the right one to help you work through that pile of stuff you've hidden in the corner, you aren't alone. While it's important to find skilled counselors to help us dig through the deepest traumas, in the meantime, there are people out there who will help you support the weight of what you've got sitting there. Let them. Don't worry about whether they'll get something on their clothes. Don't think about how it smells or what it looks like. Just know that, together, we can bear so much more weight than we think we can, and that there are people out there who care for you who would like nothing more than to hoist up a corner and take some of the pressure off of you. That's how we're designed. That's what we do for each other. And while it takes some practice (often, years of practice), that feeling of relief that you get when others come along to help bear the load is the beginning of healing. 

Thank you for your courage.
You will get there from here. I know it. You won't do it alone, but that's the sweetest part of this. You'll discover, along the way, which of your friends and family is really great at unpacking, cleaning up, and showing up. Let them. Don't apologize. It's how we're designed. Embrace it and know that you were never supposed to hold all of this by yourself. 


Monday, November 06, 2017

The Problem With Compartmentalizing

By Creator:Giulio Bonasone - http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/392735This file was donated to Wikimedia Commons by as part of a project by the Metropolitan Museum of Art. 

It is just so tempting, and it's also something many of us are conditioned to do from the time we're little: set aside strong emotions or difficult thoughts until later.

I can't deal with that right now.
I can't think about that right now.
Let me just get through this.

Compartmentalization has its purpose, to be sure. When you're physically occupied by something else - say, driving - you really need to focus on the task at hand. But all too often, when we seek to tuck something away "for later," what we are really doing is hoping it will stay tucked away so that we don't ever have to see it again. And unfortunately, the kinds of things we generally hope to never have to see again are usually the kinds of things that will end up demanding our attention in one way or another at some point.

I've had both extreme examples of this (repressing the memories of childhood sexual assault for decades) and moderate examples (putting aside my fears and grief at the serious illness my husband struggled with so that I could get through the day raising two toddlers), and both times it came back to bite me in the ass.  In the first case, I developed a severe anxiety disorder that made it hard for me to work and live the life I wanted to live for many years until I examined and explored the abuse, and in the second, I spent three years working with a therapist to overcome a depression that nearly drove me to suicide.

What I've learned is that while I may not have the luxury of expressing my emotions and really sitting with my grief every time it shows up, if I don't acknowledge it to some degree in real-time, I will suffer the consequences.  Because here's the thing: if I just keep tucking it away in some box labeled "Later," what are the odds that I will ever voluntarily choose to go back and open that box of pain and look at it? Why wouldn't I just keep it in the corner, always finding some other thing to keep me busy. Who in their right mind would want to set aside time and energy to reopen a container of sadness and grief?

So these days, when I'm confronted with a particularly difficult situation, I do my best to fold it into my life. I cry while I'm walking the dogs or doing dishes. I call a friend during lunch and ask for support. I give myself permission to honor the struggle, even if it means I sob a little every day, because hoarding the feelings I don't want to feel in some back room might be the thing that ultimately brings down the whole house. I know. I've been there, and I don't want to do that again. Big piles of junk attract rats and disease. Dealing with the trash one day at a time means that I don't have to dread what might jump out at me from that heap someday.
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