Friday, May 26, 2017

Dialogue Gone Wrong

I am a lover of words, a lover of conversation, someone who is incredibly interested in learning new things. And I often do my learning via story, as many of us do. I am also a story teller, a person who revels in teasing out the details and painting a picture and explaining (over-explaining, "selling past the close," as my husband says sometimes) in order for others to understand.

And so when my words are misconstrued, I get frustrated.
When my stories are interrupted, because the listener thinks they already know what I'm saying, or they've formed some opinion that is counter to mine, I get even more frustrated.

When I watch the interruption be compounded by other voices piling on, interrupting other speakers, or further taking my comments away from where I would have had them go, I often go in to defensive mode and try to swing it all back to where I started.  Unfortunately, that is where I lose the purpose of the dialogue and make things worse.

Listening is a difficult thing to do, especially when we have been taught that we show our intelligence by challenging others' versions of things, by demonstrating our knowledge and talking, talking, talking. So much of what we do as human beings is try to convince others that our viewpoint is the best, the most accurate, the "right" one. Often, we get so attached to our own perspective that we take it personally when someone doesn't agree with us, isn't awestruck by the story we've told that illustrates why our reality is so much more valid than the one they presented.

As I get older, I am beginning to think that intelligence doesn't lie anywhere near the realm of talking. When we rush to interrupt someone else and inject our own version of things, we aren't showing our cleverness, we are demonstrating our need to be heard rather than a desire to learn.

It is difficult, but I think that the people who are the most intelligent are those who are quiet, who listen with a clear mind and ask thoughtful, clarifying questions. When someone else is talking to us, they are attempting to explain something that we don't already know, that we may not have experienced. If we are to truly engage in a mutually satisfying exchange, it is imperative that we seek to understand, not race to respond.

This is especially hard to do in group settings. Often, the need to prove ourselves takes over and we first engage in body language that is assertive (eye rolling, head shaking, leaning in and opening our mouths in anticipation of 'our turn,') and then label ("that's racist," "that's wrong,") or use superlatives like always/never, or make it personal ("that's not my experience; here's something I did/said/saw that proves your experience is invalid/inaccurate/wrong"). We are bolstered by others in the group whose body language seems to support us and once we make it personal or begin exaggerating with superlatives, the conversation becomes less about learning and more about picking whose side you will be on. It is nearly impossible for anyone to leave a conversation like that without feeling as though they've had to choose between two very different ideas. It is also nearly impossible for either of the proponents of those ideas to learn from the other. They've effectively set themselves up to react emotionally and defend their position to the death because it is now personal. Their very ego is tied up in the outcome. If my position is "better," I am a smart person. If my position "loses," I am a stupid person.

Unfortunately, I don't often recognize that this is what is happening in the moment. Generally, all I feel is a sense of unease and frustration and then an overwhelming urge to defend myself, prove myself. It is not until later that I can ask myself the question, Why did that bother me so much? Why can't I let it go? Generally, it is because I feel misunderstood and what I wanted more than anything was to be heard and understood. It wasn't about being Right or Wrong, it was about an exchange of ideas. The thing is, when I am listened to in that way - when people can pause a moment after I'm done speaking and then ask questions to clarify (vs. questions designed to challenge) - I am more likely to solicit ideas from them because we both want the same thing - to learn something we didn't already know.

I am amazed at the habitual way we have conversations, even with those we call friends and family, who we trust. I know that showing up in this way is critical to strengthening relationships and that it is hard work and takes a lot of practice. I am sometimes upset that I need to work so hard at it, but I also hope that if others in my life are also striving to get better at really listening, maybe we can all reinforce each others' efforts.

Monday, May 22, 2017

It's Complicated...

By Kurt Baty - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0
I know that, and yet, there is still something so appealing about believing that the world is black and white, that things are either good or bad, and so are people. It is both efficient in terms of time (I can decide whom or what to invest my energy in and when to walk away) and emotionally satisfying (no agonizing over the minutiae, just make a judgment and move on).

And it's rarely true. In fact, I'm pretty sure the only things that are black and white are those two crayons in the box. (Don't get me wrong: there are some things that, in my mind, are Absolutely Wrong and I will continue to acknowledge the nuances within, and still condemn the behavior.)

I am a social-justice-minded person. I have strong values and strong opinions and I love fighting for space for those without it, hearing new voices, expanding my view of the world. And sometimes, I read about something in the news and let the ethical warrior side of me take over. I re-post things and sign petitions and vow to boycott companies and sometimes, that feels like the exact right thing to do in terms of aligning my behavior with my values. But sometimes I get conflicted.

Like when scandals come up involving giant companies like Uber. While I went along with the suggestions to delete the app from my phone and vow to use other rideshare companies when the news came out about the CEO's reprehensible behavior and choices that don't support my values, I was still a little worried. Mostly because I thought about the drivers - the vast majority of whom I've ridden with that are pleasant and professional and friendly. The drivers who are working in this flexible gig-economy world because they have other jobs and obligations that don't fit in with an 8-5 job. Maybe they're going to school or parenting or taking care of their aging parents. Perhaps they don't speak English well enough yet to get another type of job or this is the thing they're doing while they train for a better job. Maybe they're retired and on a fixed income and this is the way they put aside a little money in case of emergency. Doesn't my boycotting the company they work for impact them more than it impacts the CEO, at least percentage-wise? He's already a millionaire. Maybe losing some revenue will affect his company's bottom line a bit and perhaps his ego will take a big blow, but for the driver who depends on every paycheck, I may be creating more hardship for them than their employer does.

Two weeks ago, I saw a message on a Facebook group I'm part of (a FB group that is all about supporting and empowering women), asking if anyone would be interested in joining a day-long women's empowerment and employment event to provide a breakout session workshop. They were specifically looking for content that centered around wellness and well-being and self care. I was hooked.  After a few emails, I realized that the event was being put on for women who are Uber drivers in Seattle and I admit to having a twinge of discomfort. Digging a little deeper, I discovered that this event centered around helping these women, who are mostly part-time drivers, understand the gig economy a little better and enabling them to find other ways to get into it to support themselves. Uber's partner for this event is a local organization called Tabor 100, an "association of entrepreneurs and business advocates who are committed to economic power, educational excellence and social equality for African-Americans and the community at large."

Whoa.

I signed up. Other breakout sessions included one that helped women envision their own paths as entrepreneurs or career growth, one dedicated entirely to self-care, and another that helped women learn to manage and grow their wealth. They provided a beautiful continental breakfast, a full lunch, free headshots by professional photographers, and the opportunity to get your business certified with the Office of Minority and Women's Business Enterprises. Oh, and childcare. Full. Day. Childcare. For free.

This day was truly about empowering women to be part of the sharing economy in a way that works for them, with a ton of information about the opportunities that are out there as well as tips and tricks to more fully engage in those opportunities. My workshop centered on using mindfulness to ground yourself in your values, create personal boundaries, and find joy everywhere you go.

I vowed to go in with an open mind and I came out with a full heart. This is the kind of company (at least the Seattle version of it) that I can say I'm proud to have been associated with, even for just one day. This was not some gimmick to show the world that Uber is a friendly company and win back shareholders. I don't even know that it was widely publicized. This was an honest attempt to acknowledge the employees of this company, remind them how important they are, and help lift them up.

So, it's complicated. I reinstalled my app because I hope to see some of these women on the road soon and get to know them a little better.

Sunday, May 14, 2017

Happy Mother's Day

The older I get, the more complicated Mother's Day seems to be. As a kid, it was all excitement and anticipation - making crafty gifts in class with glue and construction paper and flowers and hearts. I couldn't wait to watch Mom open her one of a kind present and exclaim how wonderful it was.

It was about experimenting in the kitchen to make her breakfast in bed or plucking flowers from the neighbors' yards on a walk to make a spontaneous bouquet.

In my teenage years, Mother's Day was more of a reprieve for both of us; a day to set aside the petty frustrations and disagreements and have 16 hours of peace and appreciation. I'm sure, more often than not, by the time Monday came around, I was back to rolling my eyes in derision while the flowers stood tall in the vase on the kitchen counter.

When I became a mother, it was about excitement and anticipation again - waiting to see what my girls had made for me or chosen for me at the store with their dad. But it was also a revelation.

Motherhood is about soft snuggles in bed, the smell of a baby's head, and it's about bedtime routines that lasted for hours and often ended with me screaming into a pillow after tiptoeing out of my child's room.

It is about smiling in pride when my children do something amazing and the stark fear that they are somehow in danger and it's my job to protect them every moment of every day.

Mother's Day is about recognizing that my mother is a human being, that she had to try and hold the tension between caring for me and preserving her Self, and that she didn't always do it the way I wanted her to. It's about realizing that my daughters feel the same way sometimes. It is about appreciating the evolution of my relationship with my mother - from feeling smothered and policed to feeling appreciated and honored. It is also about the evolution of my relationship with my children - from overwhelming responsibility and endless repetition of tasks to stepping back and watching as they do things I never dreamed they would do and knowing that we will always have this bond in one way or another.

Mother's Day is about widening that circle to include every woman who ever mothered me, the teachers who took an interest, women who mentored me or listened to me or encouraged me. It is about honoring mothering in all its forms - gentle prodding and sideline cheering and bandaging wounds and holding space for my grief. It is about watching my childhood friends grow up to be mothers and realizing that we all had it in us somehow, somewhere, this ability to believe in something bigger than ourselves and the desire to protect it so that it flourishes.

Mother's Day is the ultimate exercise in opposites, the feeling that you're part of a tribe and that you're in charge of it; the joy of watching your children grow up and the nostalgia of your own childhood; the gratitude of being recognized and the knowledge that you would do all of it even without that recognition. But since mothering is an exercise in opposites, that seems fitting. From the moment our babies are born, they begin moving toward independence, stretching that distance between us and them and we are tasked with helping them accomplish that while simultaneously mourning the loss of that connection.

I'm coming to realize that Mother's Day is simply the distillation of the biggest lessons in my life. It is a day that reminds me that grief and joy live together in every moment, and that my job as my daughters' mother is to help them figure out how to hold both of those things simultaneously, honor them both, and keep moving forward. Whether you are mothering children of your own or you are a mother-figure to other children, whether you have a mother or you've lost yours, may your day be restful and full of peace. May you find the strength to hold all that is present in your life today, or have others who will help you hold it. May you feel mothered.

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