Friday, January 29, 2016

Fear v. Hope: I Choose Hope

I know from fear.

I grew up an anxious, perfectionistic little kid, afraid of new things and new people and situations I couldn't control.

I spent the first years of my parenting life terrified that I was doing everything wrong, that my children would get terribly sick or my husband would leave us.

I know from fear. And my life began to turn around the day I decided I would no longer be ruled by it. It wasn't a sudden thing, just a gradual dawning that I had a choice to make, and once I recognized that I had been choosing scarcity and fear for most of my life (all the while wondering why happiness and contentment weren't showing up at the door), it was pretty profound.

I have been watching with amusement the growing concern over the Zika virus "outbreak" and, until yesterday, was mildly confused. Yesterday, NPR broke a story about the World Health Organization saying that this virus had "explosive, pandemic potential" and it was all over my Facebook page. Really? This virus that most people never even know they have because it causes mild cold-like symptoms is all of a sudden something we are cautioned to freak out about? Yes, I understand that it has major implications for women who are pregnant, although as of yet, there is no causative connection that has been established. And I get that, in many countries where there are no options to control whether or not you get pregnant, this is a conundrum.  Wow. Nothing like stirring up fear of something that is likely to not really cause any problems for the vast majority of us.

This morning, NPR had one of their correspondents in Iowa interview Republican voters regarding last night's GOP debate and I was struck again by how the front-runners have stoked the fears of people in order to gain votes. Over and over again, I heard people talk about terrorism, ISIS, and the fear that, if a Democrat were elected to the presidency, their guns would be taken away and they would be left altogether defenseless against "meth addicts in my front yard with guns." Huh? In Iowa? Is there some sort of terrorist cell network in Iowa that I don't know about? Are there lots of armed, methamphetamine-addicted folks running around at night burglarizing towns in Iowa?

A little later, on the Tavis Smiley show, there was a political analyst who was talking about the odd phenomenon that is Donald Trump and when Tavis asked him about the "best way to fight Trump," his answer was, "I'm curious why you're focusing on fighting Trump and not supporting Hillary."

Yes. Not that I'm a Hillary supporter. To be honest, I am pretty firmly in Sanders camp, but that's not something that we need to discuss here.

I was reminded of the knowledge that what we fight against grows in power, if only because we are giving it our energy. The key is to direct our energy toward the thing we desire, not against the thing we are afraid of. That is not to say that there aren't things to fear in life, but if we take a step back and really think about it, what are the odds that any one of us in this country is likely to be touched by terrorism, contract the Zika virus, or be shot by a meth-addicted robber? We are more likely to suffer slowly from income inequality, domestic violence, and pollution. And in the meantime, when we let our daily activities and choices be dictated by fear of things we won't likely ever encounter, we are wasting our energy. When we make the choice to rail against the things we are afraid of (most of which will never come to pass, and even if they did, we have almost no control over them, anyway) instead of creating space for the things we do want to see in our lives, everyone is hurt.

The main difference I see between focusing on hope and focusing on fear is that one of them is actually more frightening than the other one. When we focus on what we're afraid of and put our eggs in the Trump/Cruz/Rubio basket, we are actually less afraid because we think we're following people who can control or prevent what we're scared of. When we focus on hope, we are putting ourselves out there in a way that is vulnerable, with the knowledge that it will take some effort on our part to make it happen, and that responsibility is often much more frightening than sitting back and letting someone else do it. But ultimately, that is what this country was built on - groups of people who were committed to working for a better collective future for us all, and that is where I will continue to put my energy. Here's hoping there are lots more people out there that feel the same way.  Fear is a strong motivator, but it doesn't ultimately get a damn thing done that is good for all of us.

Monday, January 25, 2016

This Sh*t is Getting Real

It is really tempting to go back to "engineering smallness." There is a voice on my shoulder that says that nobody would blame me for giving up, moving on, throwing my hands in the air and telling the world that I tried with a wry shrug. That voice says that it is all just too hard to figure out, that the reward isn't guaranteed, and it might not turn out to be worth the work. In the rubric of our current culture, I need to cut my losses, stop the bleeding, and get moving.

Deep within, somewhere, is the longing to write, to get back to creating, to find the spark that sets the words free and lets them tumble out of me with abandon. It is a yearning for balance, a call to feed my own desires and tell the stories that are trapped inside of me. The voice on my shoulder calls that out as indulgent, selfish, more useless blather that won't be realized, just like the other two projects I've started and nearly finished.

What is it about the path that I've chosen that leads me to this place again and again? The quiet, self-propelled churning that makes something I want to share with the world and eventually brings me to a gate that must be opened by someone else. The book I write that never finds a publisher or agent. The work I do that must be taught by someone else. I know that there is some larger lesson here, that I can't keep piling up what I've worked on and believed in for so long without some outlet, some way to get it out into the world.

But maybe that's the lesson. That it is out there and that has to be enough. Even if it is out there in a small way, for only a handful of people to see, that is enough. Maybe it's my ego that tells me that I have to get paid for this work in order for it to be valuable. Maybe it's my ego that says that I have to have sold X number of copies for it to be successful. Maybe I'm wrong. Maybe the simple act of creating it is enough. Maybe having had the time to do it in the way I did it was the point.

There is this tension between creating and making a difference. I write because I have to, because it is who I am, because I can't NOT write. Not to make a difference in the world. But I have had a small taste of making a difference and it is intoxicating. I have heard those who say my words have touched them, and somewhere along the way I got the idea that that was my purpose, that I am meant to do this work in order to make a difference in the world. I have even gone so far as to believe that if I can't live out my purpose, my work is no good, it is meaningless, as is the time I took to do it. Sometimes it is hard to discern between desire and expectation. It is so hard to un-knot the act of creation from the product itself, from the question of what it will do or can do or should do.

And so I spend time soliciting people's attention and interest - looking for those who are interested in what I've created, and in the beginning it is wonderful. I like to talk about my passion, to share it with others, to connect with people who are passionate about the same things. But at some point when I become tied up in what the outcome will look like, I begin to feel defeated. When my fate rests on whether or not someone else likes my work enough to buy it and I get caught up in the minutia of how best to package it and whether I can replicate it or if it is good enough, I have lost my center. I wonder if I will ever find the sweet spot, or if there even is one.

I woke up this morning with a resolve to let go for a while, to let things un-knot themselves, to leave it up to the Universe and I'm trying. It's surprisingly hard work to "let go." It requires me to float in a state of limbo, to constantly redirect my thoughts away from imagining what could be and organizing toward that. It means that my usually long to-do list gets tucked away out of sight and I have to find other ways to occupy myself and be alone with my thoughts.  I have no doubt that it will all become clear at some point - it always has before. I know that just because I'm uncertain and a little bit scared, it doesn't mean that I will always feel this way. I trust that I will look back on this one day and shake my head and be grateful that it passed.  And I suspect that I will find myself here again in the future. Frankly, it is that which has me the most agitated - the notion that if I don't learn whatever lesson I'm supposed to be learning this time, I'm destined to do this again (and, if you hadn't gotten the message, it's not a comfortable place to be, so I don't relish the prospect of being here again). But if I've learned anything from life, it is that things only get harder when I fight them. And, if I'm determined to live my values and practice courage, I won't go back to being safe and engineering smallness, I will just sit quietly and wait and hold on to who I know I am at my core.

Friday, January 15, 2016

Go Big or Go Home

I am taking an online class taught by Brene Brown for the next two months, and if you're a faithful reader of this blog, you know already that she is one of my sheroes. I love her no-nonsense style of talking that cuts right to the meat of any issue, and I find her endlessly quotable.  

So prepare yourself, because I predict many blog posts will come from this experience as I have epiphanies big and small, thanks to her words.

This week's lesson was based on the first chapter of her book, Daring Greatly and it delved into the topic of courage. One of the things that she said struck me like a hammer to the thumb, reverberating into my consciousness and making me really think.  She told us that, for much of her life, she consciously "engineered smallness" into everything she did. While she may have had big dreams, she purposely did things in small, safe ways that would mitigate her level of risk because she didn't want to get hurt or look like a fool or fall flat on her face.  

It takes a lot of courage to step out of that mindset, and some people never do. I think it's akin to flying under the radar. You're still technically flying, but you are really looking to not get noticed because you don't want to get shot down. But the irony there is that you end up becoming resentful and unfulfilled.  I know, because I've done it that way for decades.

I, too, have engineered smallness into my life, dreaming large and taking baby steps, all within my comfort zone. Wishing that my work and my passion might "get discovered" one day, but without putting it out there for the world to see, what are the odds of that? It isn't often that I send my writing to big outlets because I am both worried that I will be ignored or rejected, but also because, if they do publish it, how will I feel when the trolls come out and say horrible, horrible things about me (because they will)? 

It sounds trite, but all of those old adages are true:

Nothing ventured, nothing gained.
No pain, no gain.
If you don't take the leap, you'll never know whether you can fly.

I was happy for a while, living a safe life. Until I wasn't. There was a time when safety was more important to me than courage, but I've changed. And while I am under no illusion that courage won't be painful from time to time, I am willing to suffer the blows that come with living my values, if only so that I can say I did. It doesn't make me feel very good about myself to live a life that doesn't align with my values, and even if I get hurt or laughed at, I'd rather say I tried. 

It occurred to me this morning that the people I most revere are people who live with courage and demonstrate it in important ways.  The people who engineer smallness, who live in fear and advocate shrinking down, who shy away from the real work because it's hard - those are not people I am interested in. It is the people who acknowledge that there are scary, challenging things out there and still forge ahead who have my respect. Those who choose the easy fights (ahem, every GOP presidential candidate) and criticize without ever really putting on the armor and risking something important? I'm not a fan. I'd rather align myself with folks who dig deeply, who feel strongly, who rise to the level of courage and risk personal disaster.  May I be one of them. Here's to engineering greatness in my own life. 
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