Monday, August 22, 2016

Choosing Grief

It has been a challenging few weeks around here and I feel like I'm learning a lot about grief and emotional overwhelm. The first thing I've noticed is that they both feel very different to me as an adult than they did when I was a kid, but maybe that's because I have a much stronger bedrock beneath my feet these days. Maybe knowing that the bills will get paid and there is someone to share the load of parenting and managing everyday things leaves me more space to just feel what I'm feeling. Or maybe being an adult means that I don't have anyone telling me that my strong emotions make them uncomfortable or that I'm over-reacting, or if they do say that, I don't give a shit.

My brother-in-law died quite suddenly at the beginning of July and even though I hadn't seen him in several months, I was acutely aware of the loss. Like me, he married into Bubba's family - a close-knit, fairly traditional clan - as someone who came from a very different background and family dynamic. We bonded over our "black-sheep-ness" and became allies early on. He was someone who always, always had my back, someone who was as sensitive and stubborn as I am, someone who always went to bat for the underdog. He was fiercely protective of me and my kids and Bubba's sister and we had great fun together - often in the kitchen during family gatherings. Even in my grief, I marvel at the fact that our paths ever crossed, given the difference in our ages and the fact that he was Croatian, and I am grateful for the two decades I got to share with him on the planet.

A week or so later, I lost my beloved CB, my "mostly companion," my shadow, my furry boyfriend. For more than a decade, he followed me through the house, prompted me to go for walks to clear my head, slept next to my side of the bed, scared strangers at the door, and cracked me up with his ridiculous dog antics. He was loyal and loving and when it came time to let him go, he sat with his head in my lap and trusted me implicitly. I still hear phantom toenail clicking along the hardwood floors and expect to see his smiling face at the door when I come home from the grocery store. Taking walks in the neighborhood without him is strange and disconcerting and I can't bring myself to move his bed from its spot in the family room quite yet. I feel his presence in every room of my house and my grief is tempered by the absolute joy he brought to my life each and every day, by the years he was there to wake me up with positive energy.

Two days ago, my grandfather had a stroke and reminded everyone when he got to the hospital that he doesn't want any lifesaving measures. He has lived a good, long life, outlived one of his children (my dad), two wives, and has struggled for a while to really feel as though he was thriving. He is my last remaining grandparent and my childhood memories of him are strong and clear. He is a gentle, funny man who was always ready to teach us something, whether it was a magic trick or how to use a belt sander. In my father's last months, he was such a comfort and source of love for my dad and watching the two of them interact was incredibly healing for me.

Yesterday, a dear friend of mine lost her husband in a freak car accident. He leaves behind two teenage children and my lovely friend who has been a rock for me more than once. I am overwhelmed. And I am thankful that I have learned a thing or two about grieving - at least my process for grieving.

I have learned that while it is often incredibly helpful to have friends and family around, ultimately I have to grieve in my own time in my own way. I have learned that grief - like life - is not a linear process, but one that requires me to circle back around to what feels like the same spot over and over again, but that each time I come back around, I have a slightly different perspective, an ever-so-advanced understanding of what I'm feeling and how it fits into the larger picture.

When CB died, I was home alone for a few days. Someone advised me to "go do something - don't stay in the quiet house - distraction is good," and while I know they meant well, I know from experience that distraction only leads to protracted grief. I came up with a sort of formula that consisted of deep, unapologetic dives into sadness followed by a period of mindless activity like laundry or cleaning out the fridge followed by social interaction. By allowing myself to really feel what I was feeling without descending into it so far that I couldn't get out, I was able to feel the edges of my sadness and honor them without letting them define me. I follow this pattern over and over again without placing any sort of expectation on how long it will take me to "finish," and the simple act of accepting my own feelings, whatever they might be, is an exercise in trusting myself.

I have also learned that it is important to surround myself with people who understand that grief is not a quick and dirty, check off the boxes kind of process. I need to surround myself with people who don't find my strong emotions uncomfortable or unpleasant because that means I either have to stifle my true feelings or I end up emotionally taking care of them. I actively seek those who are willing to sit with me during those deep dives without trying to fix or abbreviate or deny my feelings. These are often people who have really grieved themselves, and they 'get it.'

While there is a tendency to throw my hands up in the air and ask Why? as the tragedies pile on, I have learned that that is simply a distraction tactic that doesn't serve me in the end. It doesn't matter why. I am in the midst of sadness and overwhelm and the only way out is through. There was a time in my life when I would have wished for a magic wand or a time machine to transport me through these days quickly and efficiently, but these days I am content to take the feelings as they come and do my best to find the revelations that often accompany them. It can be painful and often overwhelming, but it is all part of this glorious, messy, beautiful, painful, honest life I choose to live.

6 comments:

fullsoulahead.com said...

Beautiful and wise. I am sorry for your losses Kari.

Ken Grandlund said...

Life is filled with moments of loss. It is also filled with moments of joy. To pair the two isn't always easy, or even necessary. Find peace. Joy will come again.

Chris Gilliland said...

I'm so sorry.

Deb Shucka said...

Gorgeous writing about a topic we too seldom address so clearly. May you find the gifts that come only from deep grieving and may they soothe your wounded heart. Sending you love.

Elizabeth said...

Oh, Kari. I am so sorry for all of this sadness and huge loss. My heart goes out to you, and I marvel at the wisdom of your words despite it all. I so agree with you on countering the advice to "distract yourself." We know that distraction is really just escape and really submerging yourself in whatever you're feeling is the best way to -- well -- feel through it. I read a remarkable piece of grief today and posted it on Facebook, so if you have a minute check it out. I was also struck while I was reading this by your gentle acknowledgement of your own maturity. You're such a powerful person in such a peaceful way -- I can't tell you how many times you've soothed me, helped to clarify something troubling me or otherwise comforted me. I can only hope to abide with you, even from afar, as you struggle with your feelings of loss and sadness. Take care. I'm sending you love and only love.

Carrie Link said...

Very beautiful, Kario. So much truth and wisdom in these honest words. Thank you.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...