Wednesday, April 06, 2016

Talking To Kids About Sex (With Visual Aids)

This is a response to Elizabeth's comment on the previous post about sex as a commodity, and I will preface it by saying I wish I had a definitive answer. She asked how I would educate my sons about sex and rape culture if I had sons, and I think it is a particularly salient question. I thought about it in the context of my brothers and my dad, but my teenage years were a different time. Not that there wasn't a hearty dose of misogyny and male entitlement, but it wasn't talked about at all, and rarely was it ever challenged.

After puzzling on it for a bit, I went to a source I trust: Lola. As a 13-year old girl who is proficient in social media, steeped in girls' empowerment, and has a strong, vocal opinion on social justice, I was interested in her ideas about how to talk to teenage boys about rape culture.  She started out by encouraging parents to watch this YouTube video about consent with their kids. All of them, boys and girls, starting at a pretty young age. It's a pretty powerful analogy and points out just how absurd our ideas about sexual consent are.


I love this video because it doesn't avoid the idea that a person's consent status can change at any point. Yes, it is possible for someone to say "yes" and then change their mind, two or five or twenty-five minutes later. And no matter when it happens, it's valid. I've talked to my kids about the concept of the Least Common Denominator (don't let your eyes glaze over - this has nothing to do with math). That means that the person who is the least comfortable gets to make the rules. The lowest threshold for sexual intimacy is the trump card. So if I really want to have full sexual intercourse but my partner just really wants to make out on the couch, we stop there. Period.

The second point Lola said was important to share with teenage boys is that, even though they may not have personally done anything to make a girl feel uncomfortable, rape culture means that in many situations, we just are.  Even I, in my mid-40s and fairly fit, am always nervous when I get into an elevator with just one other person who is male. Always. That is rape culture. Rape culture is me not feeling comfortable getting into an Uber or a Lyft by myself with a male driver. Chances are, he is a nice guy who will pick me up and take me to the destination I requested without any detours, but rape culture means that I am acutely aware at all times that I lack power - and therefore physical autonomy - until I get out of the car.  And rape culture also means that I often suffer through comments on my physical appearance and speculation about what I might be going out to do (often with lewd body language) and don't speak up because it might anger the driver and then I'm screwed. Lola said she would want boys to know that these kind of experiences happen daily to girls and women, even if they themselves aren't perpetuating it. She wondered if they might be willing to imagine what it would be like to be constantly on guard, wondering if the next guy who spoke to you would try to do more than speak.

We ended up having a conversation about street harassment and she cracked me up when she said, "They should know that girls and women don't get dressed in the morning so that they can go out and get comments on their appearance from total strangers. Ever. That's not a thing." Even if guys think it's totally innocent or a compliment to tell someone how they look, it ultimately makes women and girls feel unsafe simply walking down the street.  This video is a powerful one because it is a small sampling of what many women experience on a daily basis as they go about their business. And the irony is, no matter how she was dressed, if she had been accompanied by a man her age or older, none of that would have happened.  Nobody would have commented on her appearance - some out of fear of the other man, and some out of respect for him. But none of them out of respect for her. And that is rape culture.



The fact is, as I wrote in my last post, in our culture sex is often about power, and those who are born with more power are the ones who often make the rules about sex. Frankly, the most impactful thing I've been able to do when I'm having a conversation about sex with my girls is to listen. I like to think that I'm fairly plugged in to pop culture, but I know that there is a lot that goes on that I don't see. And I've discovered that if I listen without judgment, my kids actually first love to shock me with the tales of goings-on in their world, and then feel like they can dig a little deeper and think about how all of it makes them feel.  I have also discovered that talking about sex and sexuality in lots of different ways - commenting when we're watching a TV show together or when I hear a story on NPR with them in the car, showing them a video like the ones in this post and watching for their reactions, or slipping this letter under someone's bedroom door - gives us opportunities to continually explore and challenge the ideas we have about sex.

Elizabeth is right. Talking to our kids about sex is incredibly hard. Sometimes they get annoyed and don't want to talk (or listen). Sometimes I'm not the best at explaining something or helping them understand where I'm coming from. Sometimes I'm not good at listening without judgment. But the most important thing I ever did for my girls was to let them know that I'm willing to keep trying. That they can come talk to me about hard things whenever they want to and that I will bring tough subjects up from time to time and ask them to indulge me. Because if we as parents don't work to counter the basic themes about sex that our kids get from school and the mass media, nobody will.

3 comments:

Elizabeth said...

Thank you so much, Kari. I don't know how I missed this, but I am going to read and re-read and share it. These are important points, and I really appreciate your and your girls' advice.

Carrie Link said...

Excellent. Thank you.

Deb Shucka said...

Such wisdom here, Kari. And I love reading that your girls are beginning to sound just as wise as you.

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