Monday, February 22, 2016

There, I've Finally Said It. No More Guns.

I just don't understand the appeal of having a gun. I didn't really grow up with them, although my mom's first boyfriend after she divorced my dad and her second husband both loved them. They each took us kids out shooting in the rural areas of Oregon, aiming at tin cans on a log. I don't remember much about it, to be honest, whether I was afraid of the kick of the pistol or if the sound bothered my ears. I have no idea whether I got a rush seeing the can jump off of the log when it was hit or even if I ever hit one. I don't recall any conversations about where the guns were kept or if they were locked. I do remember my stepdad's sunny office at the back of our house sporting a box of bullets in the windowsill, but I don't recall being afraid of them, even though I was sometimes afraid of him.

We didn't grow up hunting. Dad never really talked about it, but I know he had a gun for a while. I don't think I ever saw it or touched it or even thought about it. Nobody in my family ever talked about needing one for protection, even when it was just us kids and Mom living alone.

So maybe I'm missing something. Maybe I don't have some piece of the puzzle that I would need in order to really feel strongly about "my 2nd Amendment right." But, frankly, I am more than willing to forego it altogether as long as the shooting stops. As long as I never have to see another story about a toddler accidentally shooting himself or his mother. As long as I don't have to hear about teenagers playing Russian Roulette on a dare and someone ends up dead. As long as I don't have to hear that there is another guy loose in some town somewhere shooting people for no apparent reason. I'll give it up. And I'll ask you to give yours up, too.

Because here's what I see. In our current circumstances in this country, when there are more people living in poverty than there maybe ever have been, when there is extreme racial and gender inequality, against a backdrop of loud ranting on social media and radio and television shows from people who freely persecute and alienate other people, we can't afford the 2nd Amendment. We can't keep our guns if we aren't willing to treat each other like human beings.  It's too expensive. The cost is too high.

I have no scientific evidence to back this up, but I have a strong belief that simply owning a gun lowers the threshold for violence. That, all things considered, if you have two people with similar personalities and tendencies, one with a gun and one without, and they each get into a fight with someone - the kind of fight that really pushes your buttons, makes you see red - the person with the gun will be more likely to escalate to violence than the person without one. I believe that someone who owns a gun is more likely to use it to settle a score, to make their feelings known, to end the battle once and for all, than the person who doesn't have a gun handy is to throw a punch, use a knife, or find some other weapon. I believe that there is something impersonal about using a gun that allows us to feel detached from the act of violence in a significant way, such that we don't have to consider what it might mean for us. If we have to stop and think about getting into a fistfight with someone we are arguing with, we have to wonder how badly we'll get hurt in the scuffle. But if we have a gun and the other person doesn't, it's an easier decision. The effort it takes to pull a trigger just isn't the same as the effort it takes to physically assault someone.

And before you point out that I just made an excellent case for everyone to own a gun, just stop. Because the above scenario is only for arguments and road rage and innocent victims killed by an enraged Uber driver in Kalamazoo.

The idea that we would all be safer if we all owned guns is belied by the statistics on accidental shootings. According to the Washington Post, in 2015, an average of one person per week was shot in the US by a toddler using an unsecured weapon. In the first six weeks of 2016, nearly 350 people have been shot in accidental shootings. That is more than five people per day, shot accidentally. Nobody can protect themselves from an accidental shooting by using a gun. I don't care how much of a ninja you are.

And, for the record, I also reject the argument that what we have here is a mental illness issue. To be honest with you (and, again, I am no expert, I'm not a certified mental health professional, so this is 'just' my deeply held conviction), I don't think that ANYONE who sets out to shoot a bunch of random people in a school or movie theater or from an overpass is someone I would call NOT mentally ill. I think that in order to want to inflict serious bodily harm on a group of people you don't even know, by definition, means that you have a mental illness. Unfortunately, we don't tend to know that until after it's too late and people are dead.

We could piecemeal this situation with background checks and laws against certain people owning guns - violent criminals, those with a restraining order, people undergoing treatment for mental illnesses - but we won't cover the people who just snap. The people like Robert Dear and Jason Dalton who were "quiet neighbors" and "loners" without any real red flags going up will continue to elude us. We also won't capture the accidental shootings that happen at the rate of 5 A DAY in this country. And so we need to ask ourselves whether the need to protect the rights of regular citizens to shoot at cans and deer and ducks a few times a month is worth it. We need to weigh gun enthusiasts' right to recreation against the rights of the rest of us to not get shot randomly. There is no other item of leisure that compares in its lethality to that of a gun, and I, for one, am willing to forego my right to bear arms so that other members of society can live without fear of harm or death at the hands of someone who was, up until now, a "responsible gun owner," but they snapped, or they forgot to lock up the gun, or they got pissed off because the other driver didn't signal that lane change.

As a nation, I would hope that we have progressed past the point of needing to arm ourselves against our own government. I think that we have come far enough and developed tools enough to band together and make our will known without worrying about soldiers coming to our door to force us to do something we don't want to do. Besides, if our government was truly determined to quiet us, they have weapons much worse than guns and your personal stash of firearms won't do much to stop them if the drones come.

2 comments:

Elizabeth said...

Sigh. I agree with all of it, but I'm afraid those who hold to the opposite view will cling just as fiercely to theirs.

thesis writing service said...

Really this information useful for me. I hope it will help to other one to think about your topic. Thanks .

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...