Tuesday, October 20, 2015

What if We Stopped Judging Other Parents and Took a Wider View?

I've seen this article, "Former Stanford Dean Explains Why Helicopter Parenting is Ruining a Generation of Children," highlighted several times this week by different folks and I have a few thoughts:

1. She notes that "incoming students were brilliant and accomplished and virtually flawless, on paper..." Could it be that this is part of the problem? That we expect kids, in order to get into college, to be absolutely perfect? When I was a kid, our hobbies were just that - things we did in our spare time because we enjoyed them. We played organized sports seasonally, not to get a college scholarship, and we didn't specialize in one sport starting at the age of eight. We played multiple sports, joined scouting, learned to dance or knit or cook because it was part of our culture or our friends were doing it, not because it would look good on a college application.

2. This former dean of Stanford writes, "I'm interested in humans thriving, and it turns out over parenting is getting in the way of that." Really? Or is 'over parenting' as she puts it simply trying to accommodate for the fact that our culture asks our kids to be busy and accomplished 24/7 which leaves little time for thriving, or finding joy and purpose, or learning life skills? Could it be that the 'Race to Nowhere' generation has bought into the cultural notion that their purpose lies somewhere outside themselves and the parents have jumped on board the competition train to help their kids get into college and succeed at all costs?

3. "She cites reams of statistics on the rise of depression and other mental and emotional health problems among the nation’s young people." She doesn't connect any of that to 'over parenting' so how do we know that it isn't related to our hyper competitive culture that tells kids they have to know where they're going to college by the time they are freshmen in high school? When I was in high school in the 1980s, we took the SAT. Now, kids not only take the PSAT, but this year, my daughter's high school tried to get the sophomores to take a pre-PSAT to practice for the practice test so that they would all be good enough at it in their senior year to get into top schools and the high school could tout their scores as something they were responsible for. That's just one example of the pressure put on kids by high schools and colleges. Perhaps if they don't have enough bandwidth to learn how to cook their own meals, it's understandable.

4. I am definitely not in favor of judging anyone's parenting style (unless it results in physical or emotional harm to a child), and I find this whole college-level slam on 'helicopter parents' curious. As part of the "least parented generation," isn't it possible that the pendulum is simply swinging, and many of those parents are reacting to their own childhoods of latchkey kids and spending ten hours a day during the summer without any parental/adult supervision at all? No, my parents didn't swoop in and solve my problems. They didn't shield me from uncomfortable situations and try to 'coddle' me, but I could certainly have used a little bit of that. Instead, I grew up knowing that I was on my own and that if I asked for help I would either be told to 'suck it up and quit whining' or roundly ridiculed. I'm not sure that was much healthier. But I know that my parents were doing the best they could. Could it just be that parents everywhere are simply doing the best they can with the tools they have and the pressures they face right now?

5. Last but definitely not least, the notion that an entire generation of kids is "ruined" per the headline of the article is absurd. Even if an entire group of students doesn't currently know how to manage the details of their own lives, that doesn't presuppose that they won't be able to learn those lessons at some point. And many of these students have spent time in high school doing the kinds of work my generation never even considered - starting their own business ventures, volunteering with nonprofit organizations, inventing solutions for some incredibly challenging problems - so pronouncing them "ruined" based on their inability to navigate the social-emotional stresses of the first year in a tough, prestigious university seems a little short-sighted. Basing this sweeping conclusion on a subset of students who were admitted to an elite, Ivy League college ignores all of the other kids out there who are going to community college or joining Americorps or putting off their college education because they can't afford it right now.

To all you parents out there I say, go forth and love your children. Continue parenting them the best way you know how and listen to your own instincts. There will always be folks out there ready and willing to criticize your choices and catastrophize about what you might be doing to your kids (and their entire generation - no pressure). Time marches on. Kids grow up. The most important thing for any kid's parents to do is show them that they are loved and valued.

1 comment:

Elizabeth said...

Brava, beautiful person. Brava!

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