Tuesday, March 04, 2014

"The Compassion Gap" and Other Musings

Elizabeth highlighted this op-ed on her Facebook page on Sunday and, as it is fairly short, I urge you to go read it before you continue reading this post.  It makes me sad that the author is so spot-on as he calls out the responses of so many of his readers.  I agree with him that there is a lack of compassion in general in this country (and maybe in others - I don't honestly know because I'm only here), but more specifically online. I think that it is much easier to assert our opinions in sound bite form with respect to challenging issues when they are stereotypical or beside the point.  I can cite several examples of nasty comments I've seen upon reading a news article or blog post that have nothing to do with the issue at hand, and serve only to attack either the writer or one of the main people in the story for superficial, usually physical, attributes or knee-jerk reactions to one minor point of the story.

We are all so conditioned to have an opinion and share it that we rarely stop to consider nuances and details of a story that may have eluded us. We are conditioned to talk instead of listen, and make up our minds but not change them.  Compassion requires a willingness to walk in someone else's shoes, or at least acknowledge that their shoes are different from yours in a fundamental way. Compassion requires curiosity about the circumstances of another person's life and it implores us to suspend (or altogether eliminate) judgment. In order to be compassionate, we have to take the time to build a bridge from the parts of us that are most human to the parts of others that are most human and that takes courage.

I struggle most with compassion when I am trying the hardest to keep fear at bay. When I see a parent grieving for their child, my mind races to find all of the reasons why that could never happen to me and often, that manifests itself as judgment. If that mom/dad hadn't made the choice to ______________, this wouldn't have happened. The more I convince myself that someone else is Wrong and my decisions are Right, the easier it is to feel safe, to believe that whatever horrible thing this person is suffering won't visit itself on me and my loved ones.  Finding my way to compassion means that I have to step off of that righteous path and into the soft muck on the side of the trail, facing my fears and acknowledging that I am just as human as anyone else and I can't know the details of someone else's story. It requires me to open up and let fear and sadness move through me, to take up the mantle of shared humanity and responsibility and bear the weight of another person's struggle along with them. It asks me to sit firmly in the knowledge that we are not 'other,' we are not separate, we all deserve love and acceptance and when we give it freely to one another we are stronger and happier for it.

It takes time and energy to be compassionate, much more time than is required to dash off a pithy, snarky remark about someone's weight or tattoos or sexual proclivities. We have to be willing to consider, to listen, to really pay attention, and many of us don't want to do that. We also have to be willing to forego the opportunity to see our own opinions in print or hear our own voices. One draw of the internet is that it allows us to all have our say. Our words can reach audiences we could never have dreamed of before and we don't have to write an entire op-ed or letter to the editor of our hometown newspaper. But if "our say" is a twitter-length rant on how inferior someone else is or how they deserved whatever they got, it showcases our inability to understand the deeper connections and the vital points of any story.  Last week in our region an elementary teacher was convicted of having a sexual relationship with one of her students. The photograph of the teacher that ran on the news outlet's Facebook page was of a mixed-race woman with facial hair. I cringed as I saw it, knowing what most of the comments would be like. Sure enough, there were hundreds of people questioning her gender, saying that of course she was a "child molester" given her physical appearance, and suggesting hateful things ought to happen to her, not because of her crime, but "because she needs to shave." There were a few token comments from people outraged that the conversation was about her appearance instead of her crime, and a couple explaining the symptoms of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome which causes some women to grow facial hair, but the vast majority were hateful, even violent comments based solely on the photograph the media ran.

I asked Lola what compassion means to her and if she thought it was something that can be taught. She wasn't very articulate about her definition of it, but she did say that she doesn't think you can teach compassion. She said, "I think it's individual for everyone. They need to come to it on their own and they can't do it all the time. But you can put people in situations where they might think about it more - like volunteering at a homeless shelter or something - and then they might come to it faster on their own."

I hope she's right, or maybe I don't. I'd like to think that compassion is something we can teach, but even if we can only plant the seeds and hope it spreads, that's at least something I'm willing to put a lot of time and effort into, at least in my own household.



4 comments:

Dee said...

Dear Kari, NK's New York Times article is spot on, and as you said, he's highlighted a sad reality of the culture in which we live. To learn compassion takes a willingness, I believe, to think outside the box of our own life. And many people are unwilling to do that. I don't know why. Other people may be caught up in the hubris of their own safety.

Your daughter, I think, is right. Volunteering among those who "seem" to differ from us economically or socially or in some other way can help crack open the walls of that box and let compassion seep in. Another thing that helps is an emergency when people must work together for a common good. It seems to me that many people do not normally realize that we do share a common good.

Because we have lost in our country a sense of community, we have lost the gifts we can give one another. Peace.

Chris Gilliland said...

Wonderful piece! Thank you for sharing the editorial as well. It seems like there is often a huge lack of empathy in our society. If we all took the time to try to put ourselves into each others shoes, we may react differently and with more compassion. I'd like to think this can be taught to a certain extent, as you say, by planting the seeds.

Elizabeth said...

Beautiful article -- I admire how measured you are, what a great listener you and how open and tolerant your viewpoints --

Carrie Link said...

"We are conditioned to talk instead of listen, and make up our minds but not change them." SO TRUE!

As the Dalai Lama says, "There is compassion, then there's everything else."

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