Sunday, June 17, 2018

This is Not a Father's Day Post

By Dave Huth from Allegany County, NY, USA - Pill bug, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=64866062
My gut can be the source of some pretty deep knowing. It's often the first place I get an energetic "hit" when something is off or really, really right. But it's also the site of connection to my daughters and I realized this morning that if I'm not paying really close attention, it can lead me to places I don't want to go.

I decided a long time ago that I didn't want to make parenting decisions (or, really, any decisions, for that matter) out of fear. While fear is important, it's important as a first hit emotion, not a "let's move forward" emotion. So when I let energy sit in my belly, it's not good. Especially when it comes to my kids.

The alternative to acting out of fear, for me, is acting out of love, and for that, I need to be in my heart. I have to really work to open a portal from my belly upward and let that energy move to a place of abundance and openness and vulnerability. And that's the shitty part.

When I close my eyes and think of my gut and the way fear feels there, I shrink forward like a pill bug, curling around those soft parts and protecting them. But that traps the energy there and while it feels safe, it's not sustainable. My babies were in my belly for a finite period of time for a reason. I wasn't meant to protect them forever. And as they grow up and make their way in the world without me, I still feel that tug just below my navel - a cord of connection that is like an early warning system. It's always 'on.'

These days when I am afraid for my girls, the stakes seem so much bigger. They're driving, working, spending time with people I've never met and maybe never will. They are making decisions I don't know about and maybe wouldn't make for myself or them, given half a chance. The gut hits tell me to draw in, tug on that cord to keep them closer to me, curl around and try to protect them again. That's fear. Fortunately, sometimes I have the presence and ability to remember that I chose not to act out of fear.

It's time to draw that cord up through to my heart, to open and expand, to breathe and shine light and lead with love. It's time to trust that the connection will always be there, it's just that the nature of it is changing, like everything else does. It's time to remember that fear shrinks, dims the light, takes so much energy, but love expands and shines and releases energy. These girls are up and on their own legs, and when they wobble, I'll be here, with open arms, standing tall with my shoulders back, leading with my heart, because love is so much more powerful and transformative than fear.

Sunday, June 03, 2018

An Open Letter to Men Whose Daughters Opened Their Eyes To Feminism


By Father of JGKlein, used with permission - Father of JGKlein, used with permission, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=10787084
If you are among the men who claim to have awakened to feminism because you had a daughter, I just want to let you in on a secret: that’s not feminism. If, before you had a female child who shares your DNA, who may or may not continue your legacy, you didn’t identify as a feminist – despite the fact that you have spent your life surrounded by women in one way or another – you’re not one now.
You may be on your way to finding feminism, but you’ve got a ways to go, so keep moving. You are not yet enlightened.

What you’ve found is narcissism. Or, alternately, patriarchy masquerading as feminism. If you suddenly see your daughter as a human being who might be mistreated based on her gender, if you feel compelled to protect her and fight for her rights, that’s patriarchy. If you look in to your daughter’s eyes and see yourself, or watch her on the soccer field and think, “she got that from me,” that’s narcissism. You feel as though you have a vested interest in her equality simply because she is ‘of you.’ 

Feminism is about all women and girls, so if you had a mother or a sister or aunties or female teachers or friends who were girls, and you didn’t feel compelled to support their struggle for equality before now, keep working. 

I’m happy you’ve gotten this far, but I’m not going to congratulate you on your newfound social justice muscle. We have way too much work to do for me to take the time or energy to make you feel better. You can join us, watch us, learn from us, and hopefully you’ll make it to feminism at some point. But you are not the center of the universe here. 

Women and girls have been raised to believe that the male gaze is the one that is most important – their daddies, their coaches, their bosses. Because men are the ones who have traditionally been in power, it is their acknowledgment and support we have been taught to seek, so I understand why you might think you deserve to be praised for this novel idea you had – that girls are people, too – thanks to your fatherhood. I’m here to tell you that that is all nonsense and you’ve been sold a lie. Women and girls are people regardless of whether you think they are or not. Women and girls are powerful, smart, and deserving of all the same things men are, their relationship to or with men notwithstanding. We don’t deserve equality because we are your sisters or your cousins or we have your eyes. We deserve equality. Period.

So put away your self-concern and self-congratulation and get on with it. We have miles to go and you’re a bit behind. 

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

When The Story Gets Too Heavy

Naturvetenskap 1

 I am a storyteller and I have been my whole life. I carry them inside me, work on them, figure out the best way to share them. But sometimes the stories get heavy. Before I ever put anything on the page, the words and feelings chase each other around and around inside, making connections and trying to fit the puzzle pieces together. When I sit too long with the stories, they start to burn and I know it's time to walk or go pull weeds. Somehow, being outside helps the sentences flow and combine in ways they can't when I am indoors.

The stories of the last year and a half are heavier than many that have gone before, and I'm finding that walking takes on a new urgency for me and it also requires a focus I haven't been forced to have before. These days, I have to walk farther away from home and immerse myself in places that are new and expansive in order to divorce myself from the circling thoughts and feelings. I have found an open space surrounded by trees where few people go and at least once a week I walk there and sit and untether the words from each other, and also from my head and heart. Sitting in this place just breathing helps to re-string it all in a way that offers clarity.

I am learning that there is a sort of chemical reaction taking place as I assimilate the stories and try to keep my heart and my head on the same level. Most days, the two are at war, fighting for supremacy, which sometimes means wild swings from sadness to anger. My brain can only witness so much grief before it burns it off with anger, like alcohol in a skillet. My heart is simultaneously relieved of its burden and seduced by the beautiful flames, but the anger is also expansive and  at some point I realize it is taking up too much space in my head. The sadness dissipated, but the stories are still there and they are all about other people. I imagine a large section of my brain colonized by the stories of others, the actions of others, the words of others, and I am impatient to evict them.

When I was in college, the days I spent in the Chemistry lab were some of my favorites. The cool, cave-like room with its expanse of concrete worktops and glass beakers and pipettes and orderly rhythms gave me a stillness and a focus. There were rules, a set of steps to be taken, and all that was asked of me was to do one thing at a time and remain curious - observe and report. Even if I knew what I was supposed to be creating, somehow the cascading chemical reactions along the way were always enchanting - sometimes it was a smell or a particular color flame that I hadn't expected. Witnessing the magic kept me from getting caught up in the story or the sequence. I had my instructions. Observe and report. Remain curious.




Wednesday, May 09, 2018

Tough Love is For the Birds...

and for the parents. 

If you were raised in the 1970s and early 1980s, you might be familiar with the "tough love" approach. It was my dad's go-to method of parenting. Figure out how to treat your kid like they'd be treated in "the adult world" and apply that. And tell them it was "for your own good - you'll thank me someday." 

I didn't. Ever. Thank him. 

I have, on occasion, been sorely tempted to employ the Tough Love method of parenting - telling my kids to suck it up, stop sniveling. Urban Dictionary defines it as "being cruel to be kind;" Dictionary.com says it's "promotion of a person's welfare, especially that of an addict, child, or criminal, by enforcing certain constraints on them, or requiring them to take responsibility for their actions." I call bullshit. 

Tough love is about the parents, it's not about the kids. When parents use these tactics, it's because they're uncomfortable with their own kids' pain. Every time my dad told me to stop crying it was because he couldn't stand to see me cry. (I didn't know that at the time - I thought there was something really wrong with me that I cried so easily.) Every time my dad told me that I had created the mess so I'd have to figure out how to fix it, it was because he didn't have the bandwidth to sit with me, listen to me, soothe my feelings, and help me talk through how I got here and how to move forward. 

I'm not saying he was a monster. He was a product of his time, and that was the prevailing parenting wisdom in those days. But I am saying that it had nothing to do with me and everything to do with him, his discomfort with strong emotions, and his insecurity with parenting overall. If he convinced himself that he was doing what was in my best interest, "promoting my welfare," he could wipe his hands of the affair altogether. It was mine to figure out. I'd be fine. I'd pull myself up from my bootstraps and learn (or I wouldn't, and he still wouldn't be accountable or have to jump to action).

How do I know this? Because the other day when I was supremely frustrated with my kid, worried about a choice she was tasked with making, and so overwhelmed with emotion about the entire situation, I considered taking the Tough Love approach. Not because she's nearly 16. Not because I thought it was in her best interest. Because I. Was. Tired. Because I couldn't stand to see her struggle anymore and if I just told her to figure it out on her own, then I wouldn't have to think about it anymore. 

It was about me and my pain, not hers. It was because hanging in there, holding space for her angst and confusion and really empathizing with the fact that there was no easy answer felt too hard. I'm happy to say that instead of channeling my dad, I took the dogs for a walk and gave myself some space to breathe and remember that I know how to do hard things, especially when I'm doing them with people that I love fiercely. I was reminded that walking beside her, being exactly who she needed me to be in the moment of her biggest challenge, and not throwing her to the wolves is my job as her mother and her champion. I can model for her that sticking by the people you love when things are hard is what we do. I can remind her that she can lean on me when she's tired and it all feels too much. And I can remember that, no matter how difficult this all feels to me, she's the one living it, and the least I can do is let her know that I won't go anywhere. 

Screw tough. Just love. 

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

PTSD and Book Club



I never know where inspiration will come from, but in general, it is spurred by conversations with people I don't know as well as I thought I did. And for that, I am tremendously grateful.

I have been part of a book club for about four years that is composed of women who look an awful lot like me - upper middle class, white, most of us have children who are teenagers. Most are married (some for the second time), and about half work a traditional job. And yet, the disparate backgrounds and thought processes are interesting enough that we have some pretty deep conversations. I have to say, there have been some tense moments (for me, anyway, who is incapable of staying quiet when I think there is something privileged or provocative or unacknowledged), but they've generally been talked through, and all are sparked by books we've read.

Many of the books are ones I wouldn't have picked up in the first place and I love that, too. There have been a few over the years that I couldn't bring myself to finish (one that I didn't even bother to start), but for the most part, I dive in with curiosity and look forward to the conversations we have. And nearly always, I am left with lots to think about in the ensuing days. Our last meeting was a week ago and I'm still chewing on one small exchange that happened around PTSD and when I think about something for that long, it usually means the only way I can process it is to write about it.

We read The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah which contains themes of domestic violence and PTSD (albeit largely unacknowledged - only alluded to) throughout.  At one point during our discussion, I referenced this post from a few weeks ago in an effort to talk about the way my brain worked to prepare myself for potential catastrophe when I was a kid and one of the other women chimed in, "From who?"

I stopped talking and turned to look at her.

"From who? Who were you afraid of?"

In the moment, I answered truthfully and moved on to make my point, but it is that exchange that has been stuck in a crevice of my brain for nearly a week now and I feel the need to elaborate on my original answer.

Here's what I know about PTSD (in my case - I won't generalize to other people's experiences): it's not rational, and it doesn't limit itself to one trigger. If, as a kid, I was afraid of one particular person, anytime I encountered another person who had similar characteristics, my nervous system went into overdrive and sent me to fight/flight. So while I may have started out worrying about one person harming me, as soon as I went out in to the wider world, I saw potential disaster in all sorts of places that other people wouldn't normally see it. I was, quite literally, prepared to duck and run at any time. I saw danger everywhere for years. This is how PTSD compromised my ability to function in my daily life - by keeping me on a hair trigger whether it made sense to other people or not.

Here's another thing I know about PTSD; repeated exposure to triggers won't give me the sense that I'm safe. This is not like experiments scientists are doing with food allergies where small doses over long periods of time gradually help the immune system become accustomed to ingesting the item and end up being ok with it. Repeated exposure to triggers only made me develop more armor which I spent a lot of time and money with therapists trying to dismantle. The way I overcame most of my PTSD was to have small repeated exposure to safe spaces, to people who didn't violate or harm or scare me. With a lot of effort and mindfulness, I was gradually able to change the narrative in my brain, but it didn't just happen. It took work.

If you love someone who has PTSD, please don't explain to them why they shouldn't be scared or anticipate disaster. Please don't trigger them and later say, "See? I didn't hit you. I just yelled. You were over-reacting." A trigger sets off a biochemical chain reaction that completely obliterates language. By the time I realize you haven't hit me, I've already felt the fear in every corner of my brain and body and it's too late for you to convince me that I shouldn't be scared. I already was. It happened. And that's one more example in my brain of why it's not safe to be around you - whether you hit me or not.

I realize that PTSD is unfathomable to people who don't have it but the more we can try to understand what triggers our loved ones with PTSD, the more we can avoid those incidents that send them in to a frenzy of survival mode behavior. Just because we can't understand someone else's reaction to something doesn't make it unimportant or irrelevant or over-reaction. PTSD starts with one trigger but our brains are so good at generalizing and so worried about keeping us safe that we can expand the list of triggers to include things that others think are nuts. If you love someone with PTSD, the best thing you can do is learn what triggers them and avoid doing those things as you continually remind them that you are safe and loving.

(For the record, I was dismayed that the book we read didn't explore the idea that one of the main characters was clearly struggling with PTSD. There was a missed opportunity there, in my opinion, to make him a much more 3-dimensional character. )

Friday, April 06, 2018

Anger

Two things: I don't like the way anger feels in my body but I am discovering how to help it leave, and for me, nature is an integral part of that process.

When anger comes it is seductive and as a human being and a storyteller, my wont is to engage my mind and immediately begin to weave words around it and harness its power.

But that red hot ball burrows its way in to me and sometimes hunkers down to stay a while and it sends out tendrils, armies, missionaries. It burns.

So what I've learned is that anger has to reside in my body sometimes, but I don't have to help it stay any longer. I don't have to soften the space where it hangs out, change the sheets and offer fresh towels. I only have to acknowledge it, nod my head at it, and keep it from connecting with my stories. My stories are meant to heal, to illuminate, to open understanding, and anger sucks the life out of them and makes them hard and mean. Even if it feels powerful and purposeful. That is the seduction.

A wise friend once told me that it's important to help move anger through my body - that movement makes it hard for the hot twist of resentment to stay. And so I walk in nature. I disconnect from my head and ground myself deep in my belly. I run a cord from my sacrum to the earth and I breathe and I move, and gradually I feel lighter. Noticing the trees and moss and meandering streams reminds me that movement and coexistence, community and cooperation, connection and distinction are my sweet spot. I cannot make my priorities anyone else's priorities. I cannot predict or prescribe what will happen when I speak my truth. But I can invite the anger to leave and fill myself up with possibility and light and let the ripples move through me out into the world.

Monday, March 12, 2018

Arming School Personnel: We Can't Do This to Our Kids (or Our Teachers)

Sometimes, I have a view in to PTSD that I haven't ever seen before. Generally, at this point in my life, it's a pretty distanced view, and for that I am grateful.

As I was getting ready to take the dogs for a walk this morning, I was putting my shoes and socks on and having to contend with Chivito to keep possession of both socks. He loves nothing more than watching me separate a pair of socks and waiting until I begin to put the first one on and my attention is diverted so he can snatch the other sock and run away with it to a corner of the room. As I chased him to retrieve it, I was suddenly reminded of something I used to muse on as a kid.

Is it better to put both socks on first and then start on your shoes, or one sock and one shoe first and then the other sock/shoe combo?

Seems fairly philosophical, except that, as a kid, when you're living in fear, it's not. It's practical. I always chose one sock and one shoe and then the other pair and here is why - if I got interrupted halfway through and had to run, at least one foot would be entirely covered. If I did both socks first and had to run, those socks wouldn't protect my feet for long as I ran away, but, I reasoned, I could always give the bare foot a break by hopping on the foot with the shoe for a little bit if necessary.

These days I can look back at the kid who thought that way most mornings and smile with compassion. I no longer feel that sharp spike of adrenaline in my chest as I imagine what she was afraid of. I know I'm safe these days. I am filled with appreciation for that little girl's survival skills and for the fact that I made it through that time and am no longer forced to think that way.

I wonder what else that little girl could have done with her time and intellect if she hadn't been so afraid all the time, so focused on fight or flight, and it makes me determined to do what I can to keep other kids from living that way.

This is a pretty ham-handed segue in to a discussion about gun control, but here you have it: this is one of the reasons I find it unconscionable that there are lawmakers considering adding more guns to the landscape of our kids' lives. Between active-shooter drills and actual mass shootings in schools, churches, and other public places, our kids are traumatized, and we are letting it happen. Consider this post by a teacher named Danae Ray (taken from Facebook postings made by her FB friends - I don't know her):

"Today in school we practiced our active shooter lockdown. One of my first graders was scared and I had to hold him. Today is his birthday. He kept whispering "When will it be over?" into my ear. I kept responding "Soon" as I rocked him and tried to keep his birthday crown from stabbing me.
I had a mix of 1-5 graders in my classroom because we have a million tests that need to be taken. My fifth grader patted the back of the 2nd grader huddled next to him under a table. A 3rd grade girl cried silently and clutched the hand of her friend. The rest of the kids sat quietly (casket quiet) and stared aimlessly in the dark.
As the"intruder" tried to break into our room twice, several of them jumped, but remained silently. The 1st grader in my lap began to pant and his heart was beating out of his chest, but he didn't make a peep. Eventually, the principal announced the lockdown was lifted.
I turned on the lights, removed the table from in front of the door, opened the blinds and announced "Let's get back to work. " I was greeted with blank faces... petrified faces.... tear stained faces... confused faces... elated faces...and one "bitch REALLY?" face.
This is teaching in 2018. And no... I don't want a gun." #teacherlyfe

Now consider those children coming to school every morning, passing through metal detectors staffed by men and women with guns. Think about what it must take to walk through the halls of school with armed personnel in your periphery. Think about what it might feel like to be a child of color, whose family history might be peppered with stories of police officers using undue force. Imagine how incredibly difficult it might be to focus on what your teacher is saying or relax enough to joke with your friends or cut up in the lunchroom.

Think about what it would be like, as you get older and begin to draw conclusions based on subtle societal cues, and you notice that your teachers are working two or three jobs just to afford their rent and your classmates are holding bake sales and car washes to raise money for field trips or band uniforms, but the government seems to have plenty of money for school police officers and ammunition and bullet proof vests. What would your conclusions be about where our priorities lie?

Human beings can't learn when they are in fear-mode. They can only react. Schools need to be a place of learning. They need to be safe places to experiment, and they should be places of joy. In order to create the best conditions for creative thought, problem-solving, and collaboration, we need teachers who are not afraid and who feel as though their efforts are appreciated and well-rewarded. We need students who are well-nourished, relaxed, and who feel safe and optimistic.

Banning assault weapons (or whatever you choose to call them - I know there is some petty argument about whether bump stocks or AR-15s should be called "assault weapons" - but I'm clear on the fact that these are not simple hunting rifles unless you're hunting human beings) is not an affront to anyone's Second Amendment rights. Banning assault weapons is simply a way to incrementally increase the safety and security of every single person in this country. Is it a perfect solution? No. That doesn't exist. Is it a key part of the puzzle? Yes. It is. And if we can take that step toward reducing the amount of fear our children have as they simply get dressed in the morning to go to school, it's the least we can do.

#guncontrolnow #notonemore #neveragain
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